An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love.

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred,... | Philip Larkin

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. - Philip Larkin


Style Speech from bottom

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. Philip Larkin

Style SimpleFences

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. Philip Larkin

Style Oval Thought Border

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. Philip Larkin

Style Default

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. Philip Larkin

Style Green Rectangle Speech Bubble

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. Philip Larkin

Style Modern Green

An Arundel TombSide by side, their faces blurred, The earl and countess lie in stone, Their proper habits vaguely shownAs jointed armour, stiffened pleat, And that faint hint of the absurd -The little dogs under their feet. Such plainness of the pre-BaroqueHardly involves the eye, untilIt meets his left-hand gauntlett, stillClasped empty in the other, andOne sees with a sharp tender shockHis hand withdrawn, holding her hand. They would not think to lie so long, Such faithfulness in effigyWas just a detail friends would see,A sculptor's sweet commissioned graceThrown off in helping to prolongThe Latin names around the base. They would not guess how early inTheir supine stationary voyageThe air would change to soundless damage, Turn the old tenantry away; How soon succeeding eyes beingTo look, not read. Rigidly, theyPersisted, linked, through lengths and breadthsOf time. Snow fell, undated. LightEach summer thronged the grass. A brightLitter of birdcalls strewed the sameBone-littered ground. And up the pathsThe endless altered people cameWashing at their identity. Now helpless in the hollowOf an unarmorial age, a troughOf smoke in slow suspended skeinsAbove their scrap of history, Only an attitude remains. Time has transfigured them intoUntruth. The stone fidelityThey hardly meant has come to beTheir final blazon and to proveOur almost-instinct almost-true: What will survive of us is love. Philip Larkin

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